19. May 2012 · Write a comment · Categories: Album Reviews · Tags: ,

Along comes a brand new dub release from the Congos, not a reissue but a complete dub of their 2006 ‘Feast’ album, with one additional track for good measure. In between the guitar, bass, echo and reverb there remain traces of the original vocals from Cedric Myton, backed up by Brent Dowe. Original production is from Bunny Lee, with these new deep dub mixes courtesy of Dub King and Nuton Williams.

Reggae has always renewed itself by continual reinvention, turning the old into the new, and this has never been more abundantly clear than on this album. The rhythms are those of some classic tracks from the peak of the vintage reggae era, given new vocals in the 2006 release, and now deprived of those vocals again in constructing a dub version of something that was already a re-creation, something simultaneously new and old. Bewildering. But good.

The instrumental tracks are those of legendary musicians including Aston Barrett, Tommy McCook, Augustus Pablo, Sly and Robbie and Vin Gordon. The album opens with A Fat Dub (version of the Congos’ vocal track Fat Cook) which in turn draws its rhythm from Cornell Campbell’s Bandulu, the distinctive bass line instantly recognisable. A Party (version of Going to a Party) comes up next, using the familiar sound of the ‘real rock’ rhythm track, while God’s Kingdom Dub (version of God’s Kingdom) uses Johnny Clarke’s Prophesy a Fulfil as its source. These three opening tracks set the pattern for the rest of the album, comprising fifteen dubs in all. Amongst these, it’s sweet to hear Rasta Congo Dub (version of Rasta Congo Man), based on the joyful strains of Lee Perry’s Curly Locks rhythm. Heaven Dub (version of Heaven Rejoice) uses the great Satta rhythm, no less welcome for being so frequently deployed in reggae reconstructions over the years.

So we have an excellent collection of dubs, drawn from re-imagined vocal versions, over the top of original rhythms from the classic reggae era. Not sure in what sense this amounts to a Congos’ album, given that the sole Congos presence of Cedric Myton is, by definition, almost mixed out of the picture for a dub reworking.  Not to worry, the end result is powerful bass-driven dub reminiscent of its golden age – and how nice of those persons at Jamaican Recordings to bother.

The Congos: Dub Feast. Jamaican Recordings; release April 2012 (CD); May 2012 (vinyl)

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