fatty 2The fast-paced retro dub sound of Brighton producer and sound engineer Mike Pelanconi (aka Prince Fatty) has brightened up these pages before (see reggaemusic.org.uk 26th August 2012 and 18th June 2013). So too have the formidable amplifiers and speakers of Glasgow’s very own Mungo’s Hi-Fi, taking their name from the founder of their city and offering a full-on dub and dancehall reinvention of the classic live sound system (see reggaemusic.org.uk 2nd November 2011 and 5th May 2013). This new release from Mr Bongo Records puts Fatty and Mungo together in a serious sound system competition, each act reinventing five tracks from the other to generate a heavyweight dub-on-dub production.

The first five tracks offer Prince Fatty mixes of Mungo’s Hi-Fi, kicking off with ‘Herbalist’ (featuring Top Cat), followed by a languid ‘Scrub a Dub Style’ with no less than Sugar Minott on board, along with nice dub touches to the production.  ‘Divorce A L’Italienne’ (featuring Marina P) comes over strongly with some neat chord changes and instrumental breaks atop the essentially ska rhythm.  Up next are five Mungo mixes of Prince Fatty tracks, starting with their take on Hollie Cook’s ‘Sugar Water’ which generates a different deep-down electronic feel when compared to the version on her debut album (2011) and on the Fatty-produced ‘Hollie Cook in Dub’ (2012). Mungo also take on Hollie Cook’s ‘For Me You Are’, this time offering a relatively sparse digital reinvention of one of her stronger tracks. Mungo’s mix of ‘Dry Your Tears’ (featuring Winston Francis) offers up a slow and soulful version of the much covered song (try to hear for instance the recording from Bold One and Clint Eastwood from 1978) and in this rendering it could almost be Mungo’s Hi-Fi meet lovers’ rock.  In contrast, ‘Horsemove’ (courtesy of Horseman) moves us firmly if implausibly into Wild Western territory. The mix of ‘Say What You’re Saying’ – featuring George Dekker – is darker and deeper than the earlier version on ‘Prince Fatty Versus the Drunken Gambler’ (2012).

The Mungo Hi-Fi mixes add typically deep and sometimes doomy electronic sounds in contrast to Prince Fatty’s characteristically brisk and joyful dubs, but it’s not quite that simple: the choice of tracks alongside the differing mixes makes this a happy release indeed.

Prince Fatty vs Mungo’s Hi-Fi, released 24th March 2014 on CD/vinyl/digital

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