Recorded in 1977 at Lee Perry’s Black Ark studio, this album now appears in its entirety for the first time. Its recording appears to have been a trying experience for Kilburn’s Candy McKenzie who, despite earlier experience of reggae recording by providing backing vocals on Aswad’s first album, seems to have been ill at ease in Perry’s frenetic and unpredictable world.

There are some mightily impressive musical names involved here, including Boris Gardiner and Ernest Ranglin, but the end product is mixed in both its quality and lasting power. Without doubt the strongest songs are those written by McKenzie herself – ‘Jah Knows’, ‘Sky at Night’, and ‘Keep Him Strong’ – which are characterised by a slow and slightly melancholy feel, consistent with some of the emergent lovers’ rock of the time. These are also the tracks on which Perry’s trademark production is most active and effective in the background, keeping the songs moving along in a fine late-70s reggae style, and worth hearing now.

Elsewhere on this collection can be found a creditable take on the well-known ‘Breakfast in Bed’, although McKenzie sounds less than engaged in her vocal delivery. Perry’s own compositions are as idiosyncratic as might be expected. The opening ‘Disco Fits’, with its whimsical words and structure, could have been penned and produced by no one other than Perry. The rhythm of the closing track ‘When the Big Day’, jointly written with McKenzie, combines what are presumably her thoughtful words with Perry’s eccentric arrangement. It has to be added that if Perry’s nonsense track ‘Ice Cream’ had remained unreleased the reggae world would not have suffered greatly.  But it is pleasing that this inconsistent and, in places, unrefined production has eventually seen the light of day, as there is enough evidence of what might have been as reggae started to evolve further at the end of the 70s. It seems that the only previous release from these sessions was a very limited release, of which McKenzie was unaware, of a 12” vinyl of ‘Breakfast in Bed’ and ‘Disco Fits’.

After going on to enjoy success working with illustrious names like Leonard Cohen and Diana Ross, Candy McKenzie died in 2003.

Lee Scratch Perry Presents Candy McKenzie, Trojan records/Sanctuary, release March 2012

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