Here comes Asian Dub Foundation frontman and sometime vocalist Ghetto Priest with his forthcoming solo album, produced by Adrian Sherwood. The lyrical concerns of this release are religious and spiritual in a broad sense, the title track making a plea for neighbourliness and community, with the other songs on the album lamenting the threat to the environment, the achievements of black women and the fall of Babylon. This includes a cover of Peter Tosh’s ‘Babylon Queendom’ and Judy Mowatt’s ‘Black Woman’. Perhaps most intriguing is an interpretation of Robbie Burns’ poem ‘I Murder Hate’, an unexpected but welcome contribution. Musically, the title track itself is optimistic melodic reggae, with a strong but gentle vocal sound and fine instrumentation, a great little reggae song. Its message is in the title; every man for every man, not every man for himself, a sentiment that remains unattractive to some of those with political power unfortunately.

From a troubled personal history, Ghetto Priest turned to Rastafarian belief and was steeped in the sound system culture of the 1980s before emerging as a roots performer in his own right. In 2011, he partnered Lucid Mover in the ‘Screaming Soul’ project, resulting in the ‘Ghost Inna Shell’ album and, a year later, its remixed counterpart, ‘Ghost Inna Dub’. In 2016, he released the single ‘Life Ain’t Easy’ based on Dennis Brown’s ‘Easy, Take It Easy’. This latest album is a fresh and uncompromising release, worth hearing for its take on the world around us.

Ghetto Priest: ‘Every Man For Every Man’: released 8th September 2017, Ramrock Records

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *