a0869349583_10Capital Letters, producing new music after a gap of several decades, have met with acclaim for their resolute adherence to the authentic sound of Midlands roots reggae. Their comeback release ‘Wolverhampton’ has been positively reviewed on these pages and now we have the complete dub version of the album on separate release. Mixing engineer Dave Sandford was given licence to play dub with the original album, commenting that “on these dubs I just went with what I wanted to hear. Of course there are the norms for dub albums, but I wanted to take it further, trying to do things that haven’t been done”. The results speak for themselves as the album sounds neither like a classic-era dub collection nor a latter-day digital experiment. Along with the dub elements that might be expected – echo, reverb, bass, drums – there are unpredictable additions of partial vocals, sounds and effects that give it all an adventurous feel rather than just offering instrumental versions of the vocal tracks. This approach is demonstrated on a track like ‘Opportunity’ which powers along happily, and also on both versions included here of ‘Wolverhampton’, one of which is a ‘stripped down’ vocal version of the original track. ‘Tell Me What’s Wrong’ has a strange staccato style that works well, while ‘Jamaica’ stands out as a strong rhythm track in its own right with snatches of vocal thrown in to accentuate the overall impact. With 14 dubs here, plus 3 further alternate versions, the overall musical feel is curiously light, fresh – and happy. Listen alongside the original vocal album and the dubs here can be appreciated further. The 14 core tracks conclude with ‘A Place on Earth’, a fine conclusion indeed.

Capital Letters: Wolverhampton in Dub, released on Sugar Shack Records, CD and digital, 16th October 2015

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