New Releases from Ramrock

Hot on the heels of our review of Ghetto Priest’s excellent new album (see reggaemusic.org.uk 11th July 2017) here are details of two more recent or forthcoming releases from Ramrock Records which reinforce its reputation for bringing us the best in new reggae sounds. First, there’s the dancehall rhythm track from Jazzy Kitt himself given the lyrical treatment by Taz in the form of ‘Up Deh’ and from Camar Flava who offers us ‘Get Back Up’. Available on 7” vinyl release and on digital download, this is dancehall but without the hard and aggressive feel of its 80s and 90s origins, giving us something more gentle for soothing the soul.

Secondly, there’s the Dissent’s ‘Trust in Me’ EP, something very different from the Jazzy Kitt release. The Dissent brings us slow-paced reggae in the title track, reminiscent of the Specials’ ‘Ghost Town’ era and similarly politically aware. What follows are a couple of dubs of Trust in Me, and then ‘Hypocrite’ – who on earth could they be thinking of? Proceedings close with ‘Je Ne Veux Pas Quitter’ which is what one might call unorthodox, opening with guitar, followed by spoken word French commentary, resolving into instrumental reggae. Unusual but great. Released digitally already, this one is scheduled for 12” vinyl release in September 2017. Congratulations to Jo at Ramrock on these vital sounds!

Yabby You: I’m Just a Dread

Here’s a new reissue 12” single of a track laid down many years ago by Jacob Miller and indeed by Yabby himself some considerable time ago. With the customary solid foundation of a rhythm section comprising Sly Dunbar on drums and Robbie Shakespeare on bass, this version consists of four tracks starting with the vocal take from the late Yabby You (aka Vivian Jackson) followed by a great dub in the classic style. The other two tracks – credited to the ‘Jah Fingers all Stars’ – keep the rhythm rocking along in suitable fashion. Mastered by Nick Manasseh, this is great reggae music for those who know the track already as well as those who are hearing this for the first time.

Yabby You: I’m Just a Dread, released 2017 on the Jah Fingers label

Ghetto Priest: Every Man for Every Man

Here comes Asian Dub Foundation frontman and sometime vocalist Ghetto Priest with his forthcoming solo album, produced by Adrian Sherwood. The lyrical concerns of this release are religious and spiritual in a broad sense, the title track making a plea for neighbourliness and community, with the other songs on the album lamenting the threat to the environment, the achievements of black women and the fall of Babylon. This includes a cover of Peter Tosh’s ‘Babylon Queendom’ and Judy Mowatt’s ‘Black Woman’. Perhaps most intriguing is an interpretation of Robbie Burns’ poem ‘I Murder Hate’, an unexpected but welcome contribution. Musically, the title track itself is optimistic melodic reggae, with a strong but gentle vocal sound and fine instrumentation, a great little reggae song. Its message is in the title; every man for every man, not every man for himself, a sentiment that remains unattractive to some of those with political power unfortunately.

From a troubled personal history, Ghetto Priest turned to Rastafarian belief and was steeped in the sound system culture of the 1980s before emerging as a roots performer in his own right. In 2011, he partnered Lucid Mover in the ‘Screaming Soul’ project, resulting in the ‘Ghost Inna Shell’ album and, a year later, its remixed counterpart, ‘Ghost Inna Dub’. In 2016, he released the single ‘Life Ain’t Easy’ based on Dennis Brown’s ‘Easy, Take It Easy’. This latest album is a fresh and uncompromising release, worth hearing for its take on the world around us.

Ghetto Priest: ‘Every Man For Every Man’: released 8th September 2017, Ramrock Records