Bison Theory: The Long Ting EP

Here is some fine Bristol hip-hop from Bison Theory, fronted by Jonny Steele from the Scribes (see reggaemusic.org.uk 22 October 2012, 3 February 2015 and 14 December 2015). The Long Ting EP features three tracks, kicking off with ‘Golden’, a smooth bit of hip-hoppery with a regular rhythm keeping it moving along nicely enough. ‘OK’ opens with up-front bass and a vocal refrain before another venture into rap, with a clean and clear guitar riff repeating all the way through. ‘Power’ is guitar-driven and angrier in the way it feels with a political theme pervading the music, bass and drums more upfront as it gets closer to the end. In summary, it’s British hip-hop informed by soul.

Bison Theory is a six-piece band, with Charlotte Coupland and Nikki Quinnen on vocals, Jack Dennis on guitar, Stevie Mac on bass and Dave Preece on drums alongside Jonny Steele. They have built up a formidable live energy, reinforcing the creative reputation of Bristol-based music. It’s no criticism to say the hip-hop sound herein is old-school and this release will encourage all who hear it to seek out more.

Bison Theory: Long-Ting EP, digital release June 2017.

GT Moore: The Outsider Meets the High-Tech Roots Dynamics

English reggae man GT (Gerald) Moore released a couple of albums in the 1970s (and to the person who borrowed my copy of ‘GT Moore and the Reggae Guitars’ back then it would have been nice to see it again). It was in many ways a very English form of reggae, light and airy without the heavy sounds of dub or of studio trickery, and the track ‘Move it on Up’ was moderately well-known. Instrumentally of its time, it nonetheless had a certain authenticity to its feel.

Now GT Moore comes along with a re-release of an album originally let loose on the world in 1993. This album – ‘The Outsider Meets The High-Tech-Roots-Dynamics (at Channel One UK)’ – was the first album released by G.T. in conjunction with Rej Forte (aka Jah Works) and Martin Campbell, with the help of other musicians including Steve Swann from ‘The Revolutionary Dub Warriors’ on bass. First released in limited quantities on vinyl and CD, this new release of the album is in digital format and it makes the music widely available for the first time. GT Moore himself is the eponymous Outsider, basing his pseudonym on his time as a musician in Jamaica in the 1980s.

Musically the album is reminiscent of Augustus Pablo, consisting for the most part of instrumental melodica tracks. GT Moore comments that ‘most of the tunes are improvisations of rhythm tracks that I heard for the first time in the studio.’ Opening with ‘Alfa’, the mood of the twelve tracks is relaxed. For the most part the instrumental tracks are at a slow tempo, with ‘Warm Love’ summing up the sound of the album as a whole. Matters come to a conclusion with ‘Jerusalem Dub’, a fine laid-back dub sound that’ll be appreciated for its vintage reggae feel.

GT Moore: The Outsider Meets the High-Tech Roots Dynamics, digital release May 2017