Joe Gibbs: 12″ Reggae Showcase Volumes 4 and 5

These two further collections of extended 12” mixes from the Mighty Two – Joe Gibbs and Errol Thompson – completes the excellent collection that began last year with the release of the first three volumes (see album reviews 29 December 2009 for a review, together with a brief history of the music of Gibbs and Thompson).

As before the tracks are all presented in complete 12” format with a listing of musicians that includes Tommy McCook, Vin Gordon, Bobby Ellis, Tony Chin and Sly and Robbie. With tracks recorded at Joe Gibbs’ studio at Retirement Crescent, Kingston, volume 4 covers the period around 1979 and 1980. The results are pretty diverse. Opening strongly with the familiar bass line of Junior Byles’ Dreadlocks Time and its intriguing version from Kojak and Liza, the next track is Hortense Ellis’ take on Ann Peebles’ I Can’t Stand the Rain, a mainstream MOR sound which is made more interesting by the addition of Prince Weedy’s Same Complaint version. Ruddy Thomas’ attempt at Michael Jackson’s Shake Your Body Down to the Ground is unusual indeed. Continue Reading “Joe Gibbs: 12″ Reggae Showcase Volumes 4 and 5”

FC Apatride Utd: Firing the Truth

From Urban Sedated records, whose reggae releases commendably respect both the rights of the artist and the integrity of the music (see ‘news’ on this site, December 23, 2008), comes this new album from FC Apatride, seemingly the only stateless Marxist Muslim football club in the world.

Recorded in central Serbia, it reflects the interior atmosphere as well as the recent history of a troubled country: constrained, dark, but also hopeful. The storms of the mountains where it was recorded are reflected in the opening and closing instrumental tracks, featuring acoustic and slide guitar. The tracks in between are pure reggae: guitar, bass, vocals and drums. There are no studio embellishments. The arrangements are sparse and the mood is sombre, with the deep vocals from Abdelraheem Kheirawi prominent in the mix. The bass is powerful and the tempo is slow, sometimes very slow (as in Selling Illusion) where the rhythm almost stops and we can hear the silence in between. Continue Reading “FC Apatride Utd: Firing the Truth”